Posts Tagged “recruitment consultant”

Comments Off on Why Should You Hire (Recruitment) Consultant??

Why Should You Hire (Recruitment) Consultant??

Posted by | July 12, 2014 | Uncategorized

Why an Organization Wants to Hire You

According to a recent survey, here are the top 10 reasons organizations hire consultants:

1. A consultant may be hired because of his or her expertise. This is where it pays to not only be really good in the field you have chosen to consult in, but to have some type of track record that speaks for itself. For example, when I mentioned earlier that I had become an expert as a fund-raising consultant, I knew that every client who hired me was doing so partly on the basis of my track record alone. After all, if you are a nonprofit organization that needs to raise $1 million, it makes sense to hire someone who has already raised millions for other organizations.

2. A consultant may be hired to identify problems. Sometimes employees are too close to a problem inside an organization to identify it. That’s when a consultant rides in on his or her white horse to save the day.

3. A consultant may be hired to supplement the staff. Sometimes a business discovers that it can save thousands of dollars a week by hiring consultants when they are needed, rather than hiring full-time employees. Businesses realize they save additional money by not having to pay benefits for consultants they hire. Even though a consultant’s fees are generally higher than an employee’s salary, over the long haul, it simply makes good economic sense to hire a consultant.

4. A consultant may be hired to act as a catalyst. Let’s face it. No one likes change, especially corporate America. But sometimes change is needed, and a consultant may be brought in to “get the ball rolling.” In other words, the consultant can do things without worrying about the corporate culture, employee morale or other issues that get in the way when an organization is trying to institute change.

5. A consultant may be hired to provide much-needed objectivity.Who else is more qualified to identify a problem than a consultant? A good consultant provides an objective, fresh viewpoint–without worrying about what people in the organization might think about the results and how they were achieved.

6. A consultant may be hired to teach. These days if you are a computer consultant who can show employees how to master a new program, then your telephone probably hasn’t stopped ringing for a while. A consultant may be asked to teach employees any number of different skills. However, a consultant must be willing to keep up with new discoveries in their field of expertise–and be ready to teach new clients what they need to stay competitive.

7. A consultant may be hired to do the “dirty work.” Let’s face it: No one wants to be the person who has to make cuts in the staff or to eliminate an entire division.

8. A consultant may be hired to bring new life to an organization. If you are good at coming up with new ideas that work, then you won’t have any trouble finding clients. At one time or another, most businesses need someone to administer “first aid” to get things rolling again.

9. A consultant may be hired to create a new business. There are consultants who have become experts in this field. Not everyone, though, has the ability to conceive an idea and develop a game plan.

10. A consultant may be hired to influence other people. Do  you like to hang out with the rich and famous in your town? If so, you may be hired to do a consulting job simply based on who you know. Although most consultants in this field are working as lobbyists, there has been an increase in the number of people entering the entertainment consulting business.

 

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Export Infrastructure for East Africa’s Landlocked Nations

Posted by | April 24, 2014 | Africa recruitment agency

the coastal states of Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique border on nine of Africa’s 16 landlocked countries. With the external trade of so many states concentrated through so few, this littoral stretch has long represented a concentration of culture and economic activity, clearly evident in what is known as the Swahili Coast. With these economies now showing near-universal growth, and East Africa representing the most natural shipping gateway to the mineral-hungry Asian markets, competition between its ports is intensifying.

East Africa’s ports infrastructure is a fraction of what it could be. The 15 states of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) are home to six ports capable of handling over 300,000 twenty-foot containers (TEU) per year. The five coastal countries stretching from Djibouti to Mozambique and all the landlocked countries they could potentially serve are home to just three. “When it comes to mining for all of the land-locked countries, the ports are the biggest bottleneck,” said Deanne De Vries, vice president for Africa at Agility Logistics.

Yet the past few years have seen the announcement of transportation infrastructure investments that overshadow those of any other global region. $17 billion of transportation projects are in the pipeline in Mozambique. Kenya’s Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia Transport (LAPSSET) corridor is forecast to cost $25.5 billion, in addition to upgrades at Mombasa Port and a $13 billion regional railway project. Tanzania has proposed ports and transport corridors representing investments of over $40 billion, in addition to upgrades at Dar es Salaam Port and elsewhere.

These investments are good news for companies operating in the region: especially the mining sector, in which the viability of a mine can often depend on its export routes. Yet they are also leading to a shift in regional trade routes that companies should be aware of. With South Africa, home to the continent’s largest and busiest port Durban, anchoring the southern end of Africa’s eastern seaboard Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique are looking to increase market share from their western and southern neighbours, bring them into competition with each other.

Mozambique Seeks Botswana’s Coal

In Mozambique the government has invited bids for a $2 billion 525 km railway that will link the coal fields of the Moatize Basin to a new port at Macuse and announced plans for a new $7 billion deepwater port at Technobanine. Expansion work is also underway in the ports of Maputo, Beira and Nacala, the three largest of Mozambique’s seven main seaports.

In addition to increasing physical infrastructure, strong efforts are being made to increase efficiency. In partnership with its port operators, Mozambique has implemented Janela Único Electrónica (JUE), an online, electronic port processing system. “The establishment of the JUE has lead to at least a 50% improvement in efficiency at the ports. The system as a whole has now stabilised, it increases the speed which documentation is finished therefore speeding up the whole system. All three major ports in Mozambique can now be considered efficient and much credit should go to the operators DP World, MPDC, Cornelder and Portos do Norte. However, since the recent unrest companies have been reluctant to transport goods by road and we have seen some backlog at the ports as a result. Particularly in the case of Beira, which acts as the transit port for Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe and, to a lesser extent, Botswana. In general the ports system in Mozambique has improved vastly over the past year,” explained Karen de Almeida, general manager – finance and administration for UTi.

Mozambique has much work to do before its infrastructure is global best practice standards. Container dwell time at its ports still average far higher than those of its northern peers; let alone South Africa. Upgrades on the Sena line, connecting the Tete province to the Beira seaport, will increase capacity from 3 million mt/y to 6.5 million mt/y, yet this more-than-doubling still falls well below the total capacity of the Tete province, which at maturity is estimated will reach 100 million mt/y. The African Union, in a study done for the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa, estimated that even with currently planned port and terminal expansion, Mozambique will still suffer from short-term port container capacity gaps by 2020.

These worries have not stopped Mozambique seeking to serve as the trade route for their neighbouring countries in the region. Its Nacala Railroad, being expanded by Vale, connects to the Central East African Railway of Malawi. The Beira Railroad connects to Harare in Zimbabwe and the Maputo Railroad connects to South Africa, Zimbabwe and Swaziland.

One of the largest competitions being played out at the moment is for the coal of Botswana. In August the Mozambican Minister of Mineral Resources invited his Batswana counterpart and the Batswana Minister of Transport and Communications to discuss the export of coal and acquisition of fuel through Mozambique. “Evaluations are currently being made to decide if existing railway lines between Mozambique and Botswana should be refurbished, which would better connect the country to the ports of Maputo and Matola,” explains the Honourable Onkokame Kitso Mokaila, Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources of the Republic of Botswana.

Yet Walvis Bay of Namibia is also hoping to secure Botswana trade, as well as that of other landlocked countries, and can at the moment boast shorter transit times. “As a relatively new port, we cannot compete on volumes with Durban at this stage but we can reduce the cost of doing business in southern Africa. Walvis Bay has five competitive advantages: Namibia is safe, it is secure, is it easy to do business in, our transit times are much better than the rest of southern Africa, and we are efficient along the complete corridor” suggest Johny Smith, CEO of the Walvis Bay Corridor Group. “Namibia has a coastline of 1,500 km and Walvis Bay is very strategically located. Walvis Bay can cover southern Angola, Zambia, southern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zimbabwe, Botswana, and also parts of South Africa.”

While the need to support its own mining industry will restrict, though not stop, Mozambique’s regional transport corridor ambitions in the medium-term, they will nonetheless also restrict any attempt by Tanzania to increase its regional influence southward. Like Mozambique, Tanzania is not free from port problems. “There are long delays at the Port of Dar es Salaam, which we know the authorities are working hard to rectify. In the meantime Minesite Tanzania is using the Port of Mombasa to ensure zero loss of production and downtime for our end users,” said Damien Valente, country manager for Minesite Tanzania, a mining service provider based out gold-mining hotbed Mwanza.

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Did You Know Ethiopia could soon become a leader in hydropower and wind energy

Posted by | February 19, 2014 | life in Africa, Uncategorized

 

Located in the horn of Africa Africa, Ethiopia is home to more than 91 million people, and less than 30 percent of the population has access to electricity. Under the Growth and Transformation Plan, the country’s government aims to boost energy potential through recent construction projects.

Thanks to an investment partnership between a French firm and the government, Ashegoda Wind Farm was opened at the end of October 2013. The 52 MegaWatt farm is estimated to cost slightly over 200 million euros.

Have you heard of the Grand Renaissance Dam?

Though the structure’s estimated year of completion is 2017, it hasn’t stopped the $4.7 billion project from making headlines. Announced in 2012, Grand Renaissance will be Africa’s largest. It will rest along the Nile River and run between Egypt and Ethiopia. If executed, this could be two milestones marked for the East African country’s development, but debate about the dam’s potential effect on the water supply of neighboring Egypt has halted construction.

 

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Few Good Things About Africa Part 2

Posted by | January 29, 2014 | Uncategorized

6. South African democracy took a turn for the interesting. During this past summer’s local government elections, Helen Zille’s Democratic Alliance party gained a surprising twenty-one per cent share of votes against the deeply entrenched African National Congress, which has ruled since the fall of apartheid. (Nelson Mandela was once its leader.) This is no small feat. The A.N.C., in spite of its corruption and multiple scandals, has held on to its dominance in part by invoking racial rhetoric and the spectre of the apartheid era, and has nearly turned South Africa into a one-party state. The D.A., led by a liberal white female politician who campaigns for multiracial progress, has had difficulty gaining voters across the racial divide. That may be changing.

And in other good news, President Jacob Zuma unexpectedly fired two top ministers and the police chief for corruption.

7. African innovation was celebrated for a third year at Maker Faire Africa. Emeka Okafor, a Nigerian, once said that he couldn’t understand why, in the tech realm, so little interesting and creative activity seemed to be coming out of sub-Saharan Africa. Curious about what good ideas from Africa looked like, he helped found Maker Faire Africa, where inventors from across the continent gather to showcase their wares—this October in Cairo, in previous years in Nairobi and Accra. The result has been astounding: mobile apps, seed-planting devices, solar-powered computer kiosks made out of recycled oil drums, paraffin lamps, and other technologies that, importantly, address the immediate needs of Africans.

8. (Some) progress in Somalia.the African Union’s peacekeeping troops, drawn from several African countries and supported by U.S. funds, drones, and contractors, appear to be prevailing in the war against Somalia’s insurgents. The situation is still bad—five hundred soldiers have been killed so far and the Somali government has yet to build any real infrastructure—but the African Union remains optimistic.

Better yet, the rains have finally started in central and southern Somalia, easing both the drought and the famine.

9. Botswana as a global leader in fighting corruption. According to the just-released Corruption Perception Index, done every year by Transparency International, Botswana was ranked thirty-two out of the hundred and eighty-three countries included in the survey, and was up four places from last year and eight places since 2009. The country ranked over half of all European nations. Botswana has launched an intense approach to weeding out corruption by setting up a Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime to investigate and bring prosecutions, and by drafting legislation that will protect whistle-blowers. Here’s hoping Botswana’s neighbors follow suit.

 

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Top resaons what Makes south Africa A Best Place

Posted by | January 18, 2014 | Africa recruitment agency, Recruitment in africa

Top reasons what Makes  south Africa A Best Place

1.     Despite everything, South Africa often get it right

South Africa’s successful hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, as an example of a nation that despite all odds often delivers an astounding product.

2.     They  have one of the most liberal and free constitutions in the world

We Can figur Out, some of the horrific structures of power that rule nations such as Iraq, Somalia, Congo, Darfur and Rwanda. South African constitution is upheld as one of the most superb pieces of legislation in existence today.

3.    South Africa  is  a compassionate nation

here is a story of child abuse where, following the arrest and sentencing of the parents, three young children were left at the mercy of a social system. As children of abuse, these kids were not nice,  they stole food, were agressive and sexually promiscuous as a result of their parental grooming. As South Africans Says “We open our hearts and our pockets when we need to.”