Nigeria jobs

Job Description

  •  Should have previous working experience for a Paper Trading
  • Must have a university degree or MBA in Marketing and Sales. Simultaneously, the he/she can also be from an accounts background and have switched to a Sales vocation during his working tenure. A degree in mathematics would also be preferred.
  •  Must have prior working experience for a multinational paper manufacturing firm (B2B) and paper trading company (B2C).
  • Must be able to speak proper English and be proficient in writing and reading.
  • Must have prior experience utilizing ERP and CRM business software solutions and must be an expert using Excel.

In case you are interested kindly send us updated CV on productionrwhr@gmail.com

LOCATION: Nigeria

POSITION: – CA (SR)
EXPERIENCE: 4 YEARS (MINIMUM)

Job Description:-

 Verify, allocate, post and reconcile accounts payable and receivable.

 Prepare balance sheet.

 Prepare cash flow statement

 Prepare profit and loss account

 Prepare trial balance

 Present performance rations

 Produce budget statement

 Match budget to actual

 Prepare tax payments

 Estimate and track tax returns

 Identify tax savings and suggest ways to increase profits

 Complete quarterly and annual tax reports

 Produce error-free accounting reports and present their results

 

Requirements

 Finalization of accounts, submission, and liaising with tax authorities.

 Solid knowledge of using ERP

 Knowledge of implementation of ERP finance module

 Excellent English

 Must have worked in retail

 Reconciliation

 Experience with general ledger functions and the month-end/year- end close process

 Hands-on experience with accounting software packages, like FreshBooks and QuickBooks

 BS degree in Accounting, Finance or relevant.

In case you are interested kindly send us update CV on rosswarnerhr101@gmail.com with the following details:

Total Exp :
Relevant Exp :
Current CTC :
Expected CTC :
Notice Period:-

Skype Id:-

Contact Details : call on 022-66931238/40

The inaugural group of winners of the Tony Elumelu Entrepreneurship Program (TEEP) was announced earlier today in Lagos, Nigeria. 1000 African entrepreneurs representing 52 African countries and territories were decided upon by the TEEP selection committee comprised of some of Africa’s distinguished industry Leaders  and  entrepreneurs including Monica Musonda, CEO, Java Solutions; Ory Okolloh, Director of Investments, Omidyar Network’s Government; Professor Reid Whitlock, the new CEO of the Tony Elumelu Foundation. Parminder Vir OBE, Director of Entrepreneurship at the Tony Elumelu Foundation, said, “The high quantity and quality of applicants we have received is testament to the brilliant ideas and incredible talent that exists in abundance across Africa.”

 

Shruthi: Interviewer

Divya: Interviewee

Shruthi: Why Africa is a next destination?

Divya: Africa is seeing rapid economic growth.  Looking at statistics and at the precedents set by China and India, Africa is currently a $2 trillion economy. By 2050 it will be a $29 trillion economy— bigger than Europe and America combined. It’s a bold talk, full of inspiring graphs all pointing up, up, up.

 

Shruthi: Why a job-seeker should choose Africa as his/her workplace?

Divya: Big C’s like PWC (Price Water Coopers), Delloite, KPMG, Earnst and Young etc., are very positive about Africa as a continent based on their analysis and case studies. Major gaiants like Tata, Airtel, Dabur. Godrej have either set up their branches in Africa or have planned to set up their operations in various countries of Africa.

One more reason for Africa to grow is their bounty natural resources and plenty of human resources which are English-Speaking. And major parts of Africa have become politically stable and hence are looking for next level growth. These regions are bound to grow. Major Time and again it has been proved that Indians are respected in Africa.

 

Shruthi: What value Ross Warner HR Solutions brings to companies?

Divya:  Any consultant who has experience in the Job market of Africa is an add-on value. So that the consultant knows the working standards, pattern of the environment, and the culture of the country. Acquaintance primarily helps bridge the gap. It gives right information to the employer and employee helps retain the talent. Overall cycle of recruitment is complete.

 

Shruthi: How are the job opportunities in Africa?

Divya: The markets like Telecom, Power, Oil & Gas, Infrastructure, BFSI, Petroleum, Paper Industry, and Plastic are providing huge scope of growth.

Comments Off on Is Nigeria Africa’s Biggest Economy Now?

Is Nigeria Africa’s Biggest Economy Now?

Posted by | June 7, 2014 | Nigeria jobs

Nigerians, yesterday, discovered the surprising news that the size of their economy haddoubled overnight, making it the largest economy in Africa and the 26th-largest in the world. It took the biggest-in-Africa crown away from South Africa, which still has a much larger GDP per capita.

Nigeria hadn’t calculated its GDP since 1990, and the new number takes into account a swath of new industries for the country, including telecommunications and the booming Nollywood film industry.

This isn’t the first time this has happened in Africa in recent years. After a similar recalculation in 2010, the size of Ghana’s economy “grew” by 60 percent, catapulting it into the World Bank’s middle-income bracket.

Given that these countries seem to have had entire sectors of the economy they were leaving off their books, it certainly raises some questions about other GDP figures we see reported on a regular basis.

The unreliability of African economic statistics was the topic of a book last year by Simon Fraser University economist Morten Jerven. Jerven argues that GDP “is the most widely used measure of economic activity, yet little is known about how this metric is produced and misused in debates about African economic development.”

On the other hand, as my old colleague Uri Friedman asks, “Are we too obsessed with GDP as a measure of countries’ economic strength and health?”

As Chris Blattman put it last year, policymakers are hung up on the reliability of statistics because they “want the world nicely ordered with levers to pull and a dashboard to monitor.” Improving the numbers we have would be great, but most countries have more pressing concerns.

Comments Off on How Nigeria’s economy grew by 89%

How Nigeria’s economy grew by 89%

Posted by | May 17, 2014 | Nigeria jobs, Uncategorized

                                            South Africa was Africa’s largest economy. The IMF put its GDP at $354 billion last year, well ahead of its closest rival for the crown, Nigeria. By Sunday afternoon that had changed. Nigeria’s statistician-general announced that his country’s GDP for 2013 had been revised from 42.4 trillion naira to 80.2 trillion naira ($509 billion). The estimated income of the average indi went from less than $1,500 a year to $2,688 in a trice. How can an economy grow by almost 90% overnight?

                                           Nigeria has a deserved reputation for corruption, so a sceptic might think the doubling of its economy a result of fiddling the numbers. In fact it is the old numbers that are dodgy. An economy’s real growth rate is typically measured by reference to prices in a base year. In Nigeria the reference year for the old estimate of GDP was 1990. The IMF recommends that base years be updated at least every five years. Nigeria left it far too long; as a result, its old GDP figures were hopelessly inaccurate.

                                               The new figures use 2010 as the base year. Why was the upgrade so big? To come up with an estimate of GDP, statisticians need to add together estimates of output from a sample of businesses in every part of the economy, from farming to service industries. The weight they give to each sector depends on its importance to the economy in the base year. A snapshot of Nigeria’s economy in 1990 gave little or no weight to fast-growing parts of the economy such as mobile telephony or the movie industry. At the time the state-owned telephone company had a few hundred thousand customers.

                                           Today the country has 120m mobile-phone subscriptions. On the old 1990 figures, the telecoms sector was less than 1% of GDP; it is now almost 9% of GDP. Motion pictures had not shown up at all in the old figures, but the industry’s size is now put at 1.4% of GDP. Nigeria’s number-crunchers have improved the gathering of statistics in other ways. The old GDP figures were based on an estimate of output.

                                      The new figures are cross-checked against separate surveys of spending and income. The sample on which the data are based has increased from around 85,000 establishments to 850,000. Only businesses with a fixed location are included: the traders who weave precariously between the traffic are not captured. Even so, many small businesses are now part of the GDP picture.

 

Comments Off on Working in Nigeria

Working in Nigeria

Posted by | April 26, 2014 | Nigeria jobs

                           Nigeria is the largest economy in West Africa and the second largest in Africa, after South Africa. Work prospects for highly skilled expats are good, with opportunities available in a variety of sectors. Nevertheless, despite its wealth, Nigeria remains somewhat of a hardship destination, and expats working in Nigeria will most likely find themselves embittered by the daily struggle, despite the country’s continued efforts at reform within the business world.

                          This West African country experienced economic liberalisation in 1995 and has had a more open system available to foreign investors since then. There has certainly been a strong push to evolve business practices and to entice more skilled labourers to Nigeria; but as most expats working in Nigeria will admit, there’s much improvement still to be had in the business environment.

                          Nigeria is notoriously associated with scams that pivot around job offers. For this reason, expats offered a position in Nigeria should confirm that the employer is legitimate by consulting with their local Nigerian Embassy, and by attempting to contact expats on the ground.
                        Corruption is also commonplace in Nigeria, and it’s likely that expats working in Nigeria will be exposed to this at one point or another, particularly when negotiating business deals or even jockeying for work contracts. Connections with ministers and government officials are all-important and readily dictate levels of success or failure.
                           With over 250 different ethnic groups and a multitude of foreign-owned multinational companies, expats working in Nigeria will find themselves in a very diverse, and mostly welcoming, business environment.
                                 However, adjusting to working life here may require a great deal of flexibility and patience, especially when it comes to dealing with local counterparts. It won’t be long before expats working in Nigeria find themselves a victim of the workforce policy on punctuality, “Hurry Up and Wait”. The country very much functions at a relaxed pace, even when it comes to doing business, meaning that a meeting scheduled for 10am may very well only happen at 3pm, if at all. Prepare accordingly and learn to be as flexible as possible.